Buckthorn oblivion

We put up the fence in our backyard 17 or 18 years ago, when our two oldest kids were little and the other two hadn’t come along yet. Our property extends to the bottom of the slope behind the fence, but since the fence went up I’ve mostly ignored the horticultural goings-on back there.

So, there’s this plant called buckthorn, Rhamnus cathartica, an ecological threat in Minnesota and much of the rest of the midwest. You may have heard of it. I’d certainly heard of buckthorn, too, but most of what I heard mentioned its invasiveness in natural areas. I don’t usually think of my suburban yard as a natural area, so I didn’t pay much attention.

Fast-forward through several clueless, happy years to 2016, when I realized that all of those little seedlings I was weeding out of my flower beds were buckthorn. Where were they coming from? Probably from the 15-foot-high buckthorn thicket that was steadily growing behind the fence.

Most of the greenery behind the fence is invasive buckthorn

About 80% of the lovely greenery visible behind the fence is buckthorn. Here’s what it looks like up close:

Our invasive buckthorn thicket

If there was ever any sort of vegetative ground layer, it’s gone for now. I’ve spent some time over the past few days beginning to cut back this thicket. I’m using this method (scroll down to the subsection entitled “Light weapons and a long timeline”). I already had Trimec in the shed. I ordered the blue dye and sponge applicator bottle from Amazon.

Buckthorn fighting tools

Treated buckthorn stumps (the dye faded quite a bit in last night’s rain):

Herbicide-painted buckthorn stumps

Here’s my brush pile so far (plus more waiting to be retrieved from behind the fence):

Buckthorn brush pile

It’s a big chore, but I’m looking forward to seeing what shows up (besides lots more buckthorn seedlings) once some dappled sunlight can reach the ground again. [Edit 10/19/17: Did I say “dappled shade”? Now that the buckthorn is gone, it’s a sunny south-facing slope!] I’ll probably also toss some native savanna/woodland seeds back there to help things along. I’ll post an update or two down the road.

 

One thought on “Buckthorn oblivion

  1. Pingback: Back yard progress report #3 | House Without Hostas

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