Back yard progress report #3

It’s mid-October and the back yard is beginning to shape up. For purposes of comparison, here are a few pictures from July.

Back yard progress report

Our invasive buckthorn thicket

The picture below shows the back slope mostly cleared of buckthorn. As I mentioned before, we put up the fence years ago and paid no attention to what was going on back there — like weedy trees growing a mile a minute. The crab apple and apple trees are worth saving, but they’ll need some TLC in the upcoming years, which ideally will include cutting down the Siberian elm and white mulberry.

I’ll be planting a few bare root shrubs back there and sowing lots of native wildflower, grass, sedge, and shrub seeds.

The clearing of buckthorn hill

The next picture shows the new view over the fence. From our living room window, we now have an unobstructed view of our back-yard neighbor’s house. Oh, well. Eventually we’ll have new, eco-friendly screening vegetation, including nannyberry viburnum, pagoda dogwood, and choke cherry.

Back yard update less lawn

The pictures above and below show the area outside the lawn oval now cleared of the patchy grass that used to grow there. Paths have been laid out and planting holes have been pre-dug and rabbit barriers made in preparation for the arrival of bare root shrubs.

Back yard update lawn and path

We’ve come a long way in five months. Now we just have to get things in the ground and wait for them to grow!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Late Summer/Early Fall 2017

Here are a few pictures of what’s been happening recently in the yard.

Gray spider on tall harebell

A fuzzy gray spider on a tall bellflower by the deck.

Close-up of spider on harebell

A close-up of the spider. I was unable to figure out what kind it is, but it looks like there’s also a candy-striped leafhopper hiding on the right side of the picture.

Pileated woodpecker on amur maple snag

A fuzzy picture of a pileated woodpecker on the Amur maple snag (prior to buckthorn removal).

Pollinators on New England aster

A few pollinators on the New England aster. In August and early September the garden buzzes with several kinds of bees and flies on the asters, coneflowers, goldenrod, and bergamot.

Lars the gray treefrog 1

This is Lars the Gray Treefrog. For some reason, he really likes our hose reel. This is the second summer in a row that he’s lived on it (the reason he was deemed worthy of a name). I have to be careful when I roll and unroll the hose!

Gray treefrog 2

He spent a lot of time calling in the late afternoons and early evenings. I don’t know if he found a mate or not, but we usually see quite a few small green treefrogs every summer, which are likely juvenile grays. It’s October now and Lars is probably hibernating. Hopefully he’ll be back next year!